The Archive


We’ve been conducting work on public misperceptions for several years now. From military facts to personal finances we have a wealth of fascinating data which you can explore here.

European Union Perils of Perception

This survey, published before the 2016 EU referendum showed that many of the public were still very shaky on fundamental aspects of our relationship with the EU going into the referendum.

Perils of Perception 2015

Across all 33 countries in the study, each population gets a lot wrong. People are often most incorrect on factors that are widely discussed in the media or highlighted as challenges facing societies, such as the proportion of young adults still living at home, immigration and wealth inequality.

Perils of Perception 2014

In 2014 Ipsos conducted a 14 country study highlighting how wrong the public are about the basic make-up of their populations and the scale of key social issues.

Hearts and Minds: misperceptions and the military

In 2014 Ipsos MORI and King's College London released an international survey that highlighted what the public in Britain, the US, France, Australia and Canada get right and wrong about the military and the armed forces.

On the money!

A 2014 Ipsos study showed significant misperceptions about personal and public finances. In particular, the cost of the big life events ­ like having children, going to university and retiring ­ that people underestimate which has implications for the financial services industry and government alike, as well as the wellbeing of the general population.

Perceptions are not reality

In 2013 Ipsos MORI released the first in a series of studies on the Perils of Perception. Working in conjunction with the Royal Statistical Society and King¹s College London Ipsos aimed to highlight how wrong the British public can be on the make-up of the population and the scale of key social policy issues.

Perceptions are not reality

People significantly underestimate how much tax revenue comes from businesses, a poll conducted by Ipsos MORI on behalf of the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) finds. On average the public think only 17% of total tax revenue is provided by business. In fact, in 2014, business paid nearly £175 billion in tax – 29% of all taxes.